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Daniel Lakens

Joining in this discussion in the best way to develop expertise. I know hardly anything about statistics and methods, but all I know, I have learned through discussions with others, and almost all of these have been on social media. People are nice enough to point out what I don't know almost daily. They will confront me with errors in my reasoning, of factual errors I am making, pretty much every week. After some months of this, I am now making much smarter mistakes, and lack knowledge about more obscure important information. By being forced to either revisit beliefs and admit mistakes, or convince someone your viewpoint is right, you can learn an amazing amount of things. One thing you will learn is that there are many issues no one knows the answer to (and where your view might be very interesting to others). So don't hesitate, because I honestly believe you'd be missing out on an excellent way to learn as well as teach others.

Brett

Some chances are given, but most are taken. Nobody can hit enter for you.

Not everything you say will be gold (so don't expect people to take up bad points), but that's ok because nobody says all gold.


Maybe save the times that people you look up to say dumb things so that you can look at them when you say something dumb? It really doesn't matter. :p but don't get angry, then you just look silly (like the angry people in the 289 comment thread).

Julie K. Norem

Wow--what an excellent description of the issues! Brava and thank-you!

Pamela Smith

Notable that the first two comments appear to miss the main point of your blog post. For members of non-majority, non-power-holding groups, it is not as simple as, "hey, just join in and it will be fine." These people are concerned they will be punished much more harshly for speaking out against the status quo, and based on published social psychological research, they have every right to be concerned. In other words, what Alison, Elizabeth, and Kate just wrote.

Amy Cuddy

Alison, Elizabeth, and Kate: thank you. Thank you, thank you, thank you. I know this will come across as strange to many readers, but I really appreciate the courage it must have taken to write and post this.

And thank you, Pam, for clarifying the nature of the issue.

With respect and relief,
Amy

Chris Schatschneider

Thank you for such a wonderful post! I have been wrestling with a related issue recently, and your blog post touches on it. I self-identify as a methodologist (but not in the area of social psychology). I have a running joke about methodologists. Who is a methodologist? Anyone who says they are...and can find people to believe them! After my presentation I was speaking to a graduate student who had attended my talk and she said "I wonder if that's why there are so few women methodologists compared to men?" Her comment really struck me and I've begun to think about this issue. Being "seen" as a methodologist provides a kind of licence to talk about the issues raised in your blogpost. But, in fact, there is no "licence" or "credentialing process" to be a methodologist. As far as I know, there is no Phd in methodology. In fact, I couldn't even give an estimate as to how many people identify themselves as a methodologist, or what proportion of them are men.

But your comment about women thinking “Hmm…I do have a lot of opinions about this…but I’m not sure I’m the most qualified person to be talking about them.” really struck me. What makes someone think they are qualified to speak about methodology? What would make someone think they are not? I don't have the answers to these questions, but it sounds like there may be some interesting individual differences variables at work here.

Lee Jussim

Dear Alison, Elizabeth, and Kate,

I decided to take your advice - and carved out a space on my Psych Today blog for women willing to contest the narratives of oppression and victimization that so consistently distort the social sciences, including social psychology. This good advice thereby killed two "make room" birds with one stone (the near complete absence of people in the field of people willing to take on such narratives [which probably mostly reflects the almost complete domination of the field by people who are ideologically left], and the paucity of women willing to enter these discussions).

The first such guest post has just been put up:
https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/rabble-rouser/201507/the-sexism-in-science-controversies

I have two more, I hope, in the works.

Enjoy and thanks for the great idea!

Lee

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